Enjoy red wine...

17 Nov 2020

Without damaging your pearly whites.

If you're a red wine lover (much like we are) you'll be surprised to know that it has the tendency to stain and discolour our pearly whites. The experts at National Dental Care have us covered with their tips & tricks to enjoy that glass of Shiraz and avoid losing your bright whites.

Brush your teeth before drinking red wine, not after

It might surprise you to learn that it’s better to brush your teeth before you consume red wine. As the tannins in wine that cause discolouration latch onto the plaque on your teeth, brushing before you drink can help to get rid of any lingering plaque.

Brushing immediately after drinking red wine is best avoided. This is due to the fact that wine is acidic, which can leave your teeth feeling more sensitive. Brushing straight after consuming an acidic beverage can damage the enamel on your teeth, so aim to brush your teeth before red wine, not after.

Eat while you drink

Did you know that getting stuck into some nibbles with your red wine can actually help prevent ‘red wine teeth’?

In fact, the cheese that goes so well with your glass of red is a valuable source of calcium, which strengthens teeth and provides a protective barrier against the acids and tannins found in red wine. A perfect combination that’s great for your teeth!

Rinse with water

Rinsing your mouth out with water after drinking red wine can help to prevent ‘red wine teeth’. Simply swill some still water around your mouth to wash away any build-up that may have been left on your teeth.
That quick mouth swish will minimise the risk of unwelcome red wine stains, so remember to have a rinse after your red.

Opt for white

If you’re not set on red, you might want to choose a glass of white wine to reduce the chance of teeth staining. As the tannins in wine which are responsible for staining the teeth are found in the skins of grapes, white wine is preferable - unlike red wine, the skins are removed during the production process.

While white wine still contains some tannins, it will generally have less than the average red wine, so may be a better option for your teeth. However, as all wine is acidic, white wine can still have a damaging effect on your teeth, so is best consumed in moderation. If you’re concerned about teeth staining or discolouration, National Dental Care offers a range of safe, effective and convenient teeth whitening solutions, including in-clinic teeth whitening and take-home whitening kits. For more information, contact your local National Dental Care practice.


If you’re concerned about teeth staining or discolouration, National Dental Care offers a range of safe, effective and convenient teeth whitening solutions, including in-clinic teeth whitening and take-home whitening kits. For more information, call or visit National Dental Care Barangaroo.